Do Deflated Balls Take Air Out of Pats’ Reputation? WSJ

This week the crisis experts looked into the comments from the New England Patriots and how they are handling the controversy over deflated footballs. The team’s coach, Bill Belichick denied any knowledge of deflating game balls, then held a second press conference in which he talked about the science of deflation and made a reference to the 1990s comedy “My Cousin Vinny.”

Vincent Schiavone, executive chairman, ListenLogic: “[This] is not really about under-inflated balls…it’s not even about the larger questions: ‘Did the Patriots and coach Belichick get caught cheating again?’; ‘Does nice guy Tom Brady cheat?’; ‘Do all teams and all quarterbacks prepare their balls outside of the official rules?’ All communications from all involved parties are focused on one thing–the Super Bowl. The Super Bowl is big business, the most watched and most valuable sporting event in the U.S.

“All parties are handling it the best they can under the circumstances. The number one rule of all crisis communications is to not say anything that will make the situation worse. Any admission by Mr. Brady, Mr. Belichick or the Patriots would force the NFL to do something about it before the Super Bowl. The driving strategy for this crisis communication is ‘Do not do or say anything that may impact the Super Bowl!’

“Mr. Belichick’s response that he had nothing to do with the balls and ‘You will have to talk with Tom” was not so good. Neither was his response he looked into the process and then presented plausible explanations as to why it could happen. The coach is seen as distancing himself from the crisis and throwing his [quarterback] under the bus.

Read the entire piece here.

ListenLogic Featured by Deloitte in WSJ

Deloitte recently requested ListenLogic as expert source for their Wall Street Journal feature entitled ‘Strategic Risk: Emerging Technologies and Business Model Disruption.’ The piece focuses on the major disruptions as declared by over 300 executive respondents to Deloitte’s ‘Exploring Strategic Risk’ study.

ListenLogic Co-Founder, Vince Schiavone, is featured in the story, discussing the massive impact of social media on strategic enterprise risk, which executives state as the top technology threat to their businesses in Deloitte’s study.

As Schiavone explains, “As the social, mobile and consumer ages advance and converge, identifying the complex array of threats from the open social universe in real-time has never been more critical or challenging for corporations. The nature of threats is not necessarily new to corporations; however, with social media serving as a catalyst, the speed at which these threats can emerge and develop into crises can result in increased damages to an organization’s revenue and reputation.”

Read the entire piece here.

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Listening Report Features ListenLogic

ListenLogic advanced social intelligence solutions are profiled in the most recent Gleansight Benchmark Report on Social Listening. The report compiled by Gleanster Research, reviews “the art and science of social listening” and examines the enabling technologies, analytic capabilities, business processes, organizational resources and corporate cultures they’re putting in place to maximize the value of their investment in this initiative in order to to achieve their objectives and ultimately drive increased shareholder value.

The Gleansight Report points to ListenLogic’s pioneering solutions with comprehensive social media monitoring capabilities and provides an overview of the company’s extensive experience delivering advanced social intelligence to leading corporations. The report also features ListenLogic’s unique “approach of combining social media monitoring tools with human filtering.”

The report also highlights ListenLogic for its focus on the pharmaceutical and healthcare space, pointing to its social intelligence product suite tailored to the industry. As the report also states, ListenLogic has been quite successful in carving out a nice around generating insights from patient-to-patient conversations.

More information on the Gleanster Social Listening Report can be found here.

Senior Moment: Social Media Shifts

One of the prevailing arguments largely used against social intelligence (the collection and distilling of ethnographic insights from discussions across the open social universe) has been that participation across social media is largely limited to younger demographics and not inclusionary of older segments. Although younger age segments have a dominant position across social media, older segments are well represented and actually represent the fastest growing element across most corners of the open social universe.

Getting Social

According to New Media Trend Watch 33 percent of the 80 million Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) use social media, which is over 26 million individuals across the United States.

Looking at massive mainstream social networks specifically, Fast Company reports the fastest growing demographic for Twitter is the 55-64 year age bracket, a segment that has grown 79% since 2012.

For Facebook and Google+ the 45 to 54-age segment is the fastest growing demographic, seeing a 46 percent jump for Facebook and 56 percent leap for Google+.

Generation Growth

This growth has not been contained to the mainstream social networks however and has spanned online communities, blogs and open comment sites, aside from the massive networks.

Today, 67 percent of Internet users between the ages of 50 and 64 are using online social circles, according to Pew. Beyond this, the segment of Internet users 65 and older who engage social media has dramatically increased from 13 percent in 2009 to 43 percent in 2013.

With 60 percent of seniors online according to Forrester, representing over 21 million individuals, over eight million seniors are actively engaging across the open social universe. If this growth trend continues that segment will approach 12 million in two year’s time.

Senior Moment

Again, this is not to say that youth doesn’t have a dominant position across social media, however the claim that older population segments are not widely participating in social media is simply not the case and certainly not an adequate argument to ignore the vast discussions spanning the open social universe. Getting a deep understanding into each demographic segment with social intelligence is a powerful weapon for brands.

Gaining insight specific to the older populations is valuable in terms of the segment’s size (~21 million seniors in the US), income and brand attitudes, where 63 percent of seniors tend to be brand loyal compared to 53 percent of online adults in the US, according to Forrester.

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Expert Insight: Social Insight’s Impact on Marketing

Mark Harrington
Chief Marketing Officer
ListenLogic

Through engagement with many of the world’s leading brands across a myriad of industries from food to pharmaceuticals, we often get an array of insightful questions about social intelligence and the threats and insights that come from the open social universe. Given this, we’ve tapped some of our experts to periodically provide insight on questions surrounding social risk and social intelligence. Our Chief Marketing Officer, Mark Harrington, oversees ListenLogic’s marketing, content and communication initiatives and is a guest columnist for publications like Social Media Today, Direct Marketing News, Marketing Profs and Business2Community.

With the wide spectrum of insight social intelligence provides to brands here are some recent questions on impact to Marketing:

What’s the most valuable insight social data can provide to Marketers? -Ashley H.

The biggest overall value from social intelligence is probably the fact you can understand the behaviors and preferences of millions of shoppers and consumers without ever asking a question. The ethnographic approach in itself has value just in observing individual behaviors across such a massive population. But I think the question wants a bit more specific of an answer. I think it’s hard to boil it down to just one, but getting very deep into consumer personas and corresponding activity and behavior has incredible value for product positioning, messaging and campaign development. Here is a review of five innovative insights I think provide tremendous actionable value to Marketers.


What do you find is the biggest challenge for Marketers to embrace social insights? – Will K.

First, it’s a new realm, which tends to come with initial hesitation. Second, hearing “social media” and “big data,” which are both often nebulous terms, can be daunting. But once marketers see the tangible, actionable insight that can be extracted from billions of social conversations they get it pretty quickly. When you work with Insight and Research professionals who have been doing this for decades and or have PhDs in the realm and they see insight applied and react by saying, “I never knew this was possible,” it’s eye-opening. I know personally using surveys and focus groups for companies like eBay and Citi, I certainly wish I had access to this type of data for the speed and depth of the intelligence it provides. The impact is impressive, so much so that were even seeing traditional industries moving to adopt it because the insight is so actionable.

If you have a question related to social intelligence or social risk send it info@listenlogic.com.